Archive for the ‘News’ Category

The Four Horsemen

Posted: March 18, 2017 by noxprognatus in Illuminism, News, Uncategorized, videos

Meet the renegades, the people who made this video, to enlighten you to the way the world really works.

FOUR HORSEMEN is free from mainstream media propaganda — the film doesn’t bash bankers, criticise politicians or get involved in conspiracy theories. It ignites the debate about how to usher a new economic paradigm into the world which would dramatically improve the quality of life for billions

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Zeitgeist.

Posted: March 18, 2017 by noxprognatus in Illuminism, News, Uncategorized, videos

Watch how the Old World Order has rigged reality against Humanity and seeks to enslave us all and profit endlessly by keeping us in chains, enslaved to them without most of us even realising it!

The Venus Project

Posted: June 27, 2015 by noxprognatus in News, videos

Watch how a changed society can become Hyperhumans in the future.

Twenty burials in Greece may be linked to Macedonian kings
15 MARCH, 2014 – 01:20 APRILHOLLOWAY

A Greek archaeologist has announced the discovery of 20 burials near Macedonia’s ancient capital in northern Greece.  Researchers are hoping that the graves are associated with the early Macedonian kings.

The tombs were found at Vergina, a town in Northern Greece identified as Aegae (Aigai) – the first capital of the Macedonians. The town became internationally famous in 1977, when the Greek archaeologist Manolis Andronikos unearthed the burial site of the kings of Macedon, including the tomb of Philip II, father of Alexander the Great. This view is challenged by some archaeologists who believe it may instead be the tomb of Alexander’s half-brother Philip III Arrhidaeus.

The unplundered tomb dating from 335 BC, displayed the golden larnax with the star symbol of the Macedonian kings, known from Macedonian shields and coins, decorating its cover: sixteen rays of different length around a central rosette. Inside the larnax were found human remains covered with a golden wreath of oak leaves. Other finds in the chamber included an iron breastplate, ceremonial shield, iron Macedonian helmet, the royal diadem, and weapons.

Archaeologists have been interested in the hills around Vergina since as early as the 1850s and the site still draws researchers and experts to this day. The latest discovery shows that there is still much that the town has to offer.

Excavator Angeliki Kottaridi said that the tombs had been looted and largely dismantled in antiquity. However, researchers did find vases and a sword and it is hoped that further study may reveal the owners of the tomb, which Kottaridi said “might perhaps be linked” with Alexander I and his son, Perdiccas II. Both reigned in the 5th century BC, a century before the most famous ancient Macedonian king, Alexander III the Great.

Macedonia or Macedon was an ancient Greek kingdom that flourished from 808 to 167 BC. The rise of Macedon, from a small kingdom at the periphery of Classical Greek affairs, to one which came to dominate the entire Hellenic world, occurred under Philip II’s reign. For a brief period, after the conquests of Alexander the Great, it became the most powerful state in the world, controlling a territory that included the former Persian Empire, stretching as far as the Indus River; at that time it inaugurated the Hellenistic period of Ancient Greek civilization.

Featured image: Facade of Philip II of Macedon tomb in Vergina, Greece, discovered in 1977. Photo credit: Wikipedia

By April Holloway

– See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/discovery-twenty-burials-greece-may-be-linked-macedonian-kings-001448#.UyOq5tVvtTI.facebook

Ancient Scottish & Egyptian Connection

Posted: March 11, 2014 by phaedrap1 in News, Science, Uncategorized

MessageToEagle.com – DNA can be used as a telescope to look back into the past, and this is excatly what a group of scientists have done to cast more light on an ancient mystery.

New ground-breaking study suggests that Scots are descendants of long lost tribes from the Sahara.

In addition, the study also reveals that Scots are very closely related to Napoleon Bonaparte!

At ScotlandsDNA researchers combine science with history to create the full picture of Scots’ past. Genetics, phylogeography, archaeology and historical analysis, along with an understanding of human behaviour and response to major historical events are pulled together for the first time…

First results of Scotlands DNA project “reveal the Scots to be much more diverse than was thought.”

A number of interesting groups were found. After testing DNA samples from almost 1,000 scots, researchers found that 1 per cent of all Scots are descended from the Berber and Tuareg tribesmen of the Sahara.

Another 1% have a recent origin in Iberia, their ancestors having probably reached Britain via the trade in tin.

The study is based on research conducted by geneticist Dr Jim Wilson and his team at Edinburgh University.

 


One of the startling revelations, was the discovery of DNA linked to Napoleon Bonaparte.

 

The research team discovered that Tom Conti, who took part in the project has a a family link to Napoleon Bonaparte, the French dictator.

 

It was discovered that the actor’s DNA marker is Saracen in origin and that his ancestors settled in Italy around the 10th century before one of them, Giovanni Buonaparte, settled in Corsica and founded the family line that sired Napoleon.

 

 

“Some friends said they weren’t surprised to find out Napoleon and I were related, but it came as quite a shock to me.In fact, I didn’t believe it at first,” the actor said.The use of DNA allows scientists to use it as telescope to look back in time at where our ancestors once lived. it can be an amazing journey that can take you to a really surprising place.

When Dr. Wilson discovered that some of the participants had DNA hailed from the Sahara, he had to double-check.

 

 

“I didn’t believe it at first and checked it twice. But more than one, in fact quite a few of our participants had this marker that is only found in and around the Sahara and among the blue men of the Tuareg.

 

Scotland, a beautiful and mysterious country.

 

So what on earth is it doing in Scotland? I didn’t know. It took me a little while to work it out but what I learned was that it was spread to Spain by the Moorish conquest of Spain, and then it came up the Atlantic margins, along the coast and up to France and then up to Scotland,” Dr. Wilson said.

 

 

The Greek called them Libyans, Romans referred to them as Africans, Numidians and Moors and the Arabs would dub them Berbers.
For Mr Moffat, the author of The Scots: A Genetic Journey, the results have been fascinating.

 

He said: “When the great Roman emperor Septimius Severus invaded Scotland with the largest army ever seen north of the Tweed, 40,000 legionaries and auxiliaries and a supporting fleet, he fought the Maeatae. They were mentioned by Roman historians as a fierce people and much later, noted by Adomnan, the biographer of St Columba.

 

No-one knows the true origin of the Tuareg, where they came from or when they arrived in the Sahara.

 

“And then they disappeared from history,” Mr Moffat said. “Now they are found. DNA has uncovered a high concentration of a distinctive marker clustered around Stirling and the foothills of the Ochils – the homeland of the fierce Maeatae. These are stories only DNA can tell.”

 

“Scientists noticed occasional tiny errors of copying as our six billion letters were passed on down the generations.

 

Known as markers, they were found to originate in particular parts of the world and through a technique called the molecular clock, they could be dated. . New markers are being discovered all the time, some of which arose rather recently, and can be specific to a particular surname or very concentrated in one place.

 

Once a marker has been discovered the next stage is to try to understand what it means.

 

“First we work out how it relates to other markers and place it on the tree, then we study where it is found, estimate how old it is, and infer as best we can, where it originated and dispersed to.

 

The first step is to genotype the marker in large collections of known heritage – people who know where their ancestors come from.

 

Our R&D programme is therefore screening new markers we have discovered and those found in the 1000 Genomes project in a large sample of continental Europeans as well as British and Irish people,” scientists at ScotlandDna say.

 

The DNA results revealing Scots are descendents of a long-lost race of Shara are fascinating and yet, this is not the end to this incredible story. Dr. Wilson promises more surprises.

 

“We are sequencing the whole genome of seven Scots whose DNA is central to our history and we are looking at the role of Neanderthal DNA in Scotland,” Dr. Wilson said.

 

We can expect to hear more from Dr. Wilson and his team in the near future.

 

MessageToEagle.com

 

A photo of bones and skulls scattered in a cemetery, taken in October. (AFP)

Topics:

Some 4,000 years ago people carried a young woman’s cremated bones – charred scraps of her shroud and the wood from her funeral pyre still clinging to them – carefully wrapped in a fur, along with her most valuable possessions packed into a basket, up to one of the highest and most exposed spots on Dartmoor, and buried them in a small stone box covered by a mound of peat.

The discovery of her remains is rewriting the history of the Bronze Age moor. The bundle contained a treasury of unique objects, including a tin bead and 34 tin studs which are the earliest evidence of metal-working in the south-west, textiles including a unique nettle fibre belt with a leather fringe, jewellery including amber from the Baltic and shale from Whitby, and wooden ear studs which are the earliest examples of wood turning ever found in Britain.

The site chosen for her grave was no accident. At 600 metres above sea level, White Horse hill is still so remote that getting there today is a 45-minute walk across heather and bog, after a half-hour drive up a military track from the nearest road. The closest known prehistoric habitation site is far down in the valley below, near the grave of the former poet laureate Ted Hughes.

Analysing and interpreting one of the most intriguing burials ever found in Britain is now occupying scientists across several continents. A BBC documentary, Mystery of the Moor, was first intended only for local broadcast, but as the scale of the find became clear, it will now be shown nationally on BBC2 on 9 March.

Scientists in Britain, Denmark and the Smithsonian in the US have been working on the fur. It is not dog, wolf, deer, horse or sheep, but may be a bear skin, from a species that became extinct in Britain at least 1,000 years ago.

“I am consumed with excitement about this find. I never expected to see anything like it in my lifetime,” Jane Marchand, chief archaeologist at the Dartmoor National Park Authority said.

“The last Dartmoor burial with grave goods was back in the days of the Victorian gentleman antiquarians. This is the first scientifically excavated burial on the moor, and the most significant ever.”

It has not yet been possible definitively to identify the sex of the fragmented charred bones, though they suggest a slight individual aged between 15 and 25 years.

“I shouldn’t really say her – but given the nature of the objects, and the fact that there is no dagger or other weapon of any kind, such as we know were found in other burials from the period, I personally have no doubt that this was a young woman,” Marchand said. “Any one of the artefacts would make the find remarkable. ”

Although Dartmoor is speckled with prehistoric monuments, including standing stones, stone rows, and hundreds of circular hut sites, very few prehistoric burials of any kind have been found. What gives the White Horse hill international importance is the survival of so much organic material, which usually disintegrates without trace in the acid soil. Apart from the basket, this burial had the belt; the ear studs – identical to those on sale in many goth shops – made from spindle wood, a hard fine-grained wood often used for knitting needles, from trees which still grow on the lower slopes of Dartmoor; and the unique arm band, plaited from cowhair and originally studded with 34 tin beads which would have shone like silver. There were even charred scraps of textile which may be the remains of a shroud, and fragments of charcoal from the funeral pyre.

Although tin – essential for making bronze – from Cornwall and Devon became famous across the ancient world, there was no previous evidence of smelting from such an early date. The necklace, which included amber from the Baltic, had a large tin bead made from part of an ingot beaten flat and then rolled. Although research continues, the archaeologists are convinced it was made locally.

The cist, a stone box, was first spotted more than a decade ago by a walker on Duchy of Cornwall land, when an end slab collapsed as the peat mound which had sheltered it for 4,000 years was gradually washed away. However, it was only excavated three years ago when archaeologists realised the site was eroding so fast any possible contents would inevitably soon be lost. It was only when they lifted the top slab that the scale of the discovery became apparent. The fur and the basket were a wet blackened sludgy mess, but through it they could see beads and other objects. “As we carefully lifted the bundle a bead fell out – and I knew immediately we had something extraordinary,” Marchand said. “Previously we had eight beads from Dartmoor; now we have 200.”

The contents were taken to the Wiltshire conservation laboratory, where the basket alone took a year’s work to clean, freeze dry, and have its contents removed. The empty cist was reconstructed on the site. However, this winter’s storms have done so much damage the archaeologists are now debating whether they will have to move the stones or leave them to inevitable disintegration.

The jewellery and other conserved artefacts will feature in an exhibition later this year at Plymouth city museum, but although work continues on her bones, it is unlikely to answer the mystery of who she was, how she died, and why at such a young age she merited a burial fit for a queen.

By Maev Kennedy, The Guardian

rawstory.com

Why NASA Hesitates on UFO Research

Posted: July 22, 2013 by phaedrap1 in News, Science
Tags: ,

close-encounters-of-the-third-kind

NASA and the scientific community as a whole are aware of the implications of openly communicating their UFO studies.

According to Dr. Davis, the seed reason for this lies in the fact that it is because the military operations govern this coveted research. His opinion is that UFO study falls within the communication category, something the military has under its wing.

For years many scientists have avoided discussing their own hypothesis and research surrounding this topic of investigation. However, Dr. Davis is among many scientists who illustrate that this concept is shifting as more scientists are openly discussing UFO investigation.

“UFOs are real phenomena. They are artificial objects under intelligent control. They’re definitely the craft of a supremely advanced technology,” says physicist Eric Davis.

Eric Davis is a research physicist at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Austin. His accolades in the science realm include his research of light-speed travel. At present, he is studying propulsion physics; something he hopes may enable humans to travel with ease and speed through space.

Sharing his opinion about skeptics’ harsh reviews, he is aware that it is a no-go area for most.

“They’re wrong, naive, stubborn, narrow-minded, afraid and fearful. It’s a dirty word and a forbidden topic. Science is about open-minded inquiry. You shouldn’t be laughing off people. You should show more deference and respect to them … Scientists need to get back to using the scientific method to study things that are unknown and unusual, and the UFO subject is one of them.”

Davis is presenting “Faster-Than-Light Space Warps & Interstellar Flight: What’s It All About?” this Sunday at the 2013 Mufon Symposium in Las Vegas. Dr. Davis, along with many other scientists including Dr. Steven Greer, are presenting research, findings and views on various UFO topics this weekend.

So, what is the reason for the hush about scientific research into UFOs?

Dr. Evans claims he knows many colleagues who quietly investigate this area.

“There are scientists who are aware of evidence and observational data that is not refutable. It is absolutely corroborated, using forensic techniques and methodology. But they won’t come out and publicize that because they fear it. Not the subject — they fear the backlash from their professional colleagues. The impact on their career might be detrimental and they’d get bad publicity.

“It’s not an acceptable, funded line of research. The National Science Foundation does not accept UFOs as a subject for scientific study.”

It may be unknown to many, but there are multiple scientists who have been studying and investigating UFO activity, despite the respite from the scientific community.

Perhaps the real reason NASA and other big organizations have made the area of UFO investigation unpalatable is due to the fact the territory of this knowledge does not fall under the science umbrella.

“It’s the domain of military intelligence,” he proposes. “The fact that [unknown] craft are flying around Earth is not a subject for science – it’s a subject for intelligence-gathering, collection and analysis. That’s because UFOs are not a natural phenomenon, and that’s what science studies.”

In addition to being the Senior Research Physicist at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Austin, Eric Davis is the Chief Scientist of Warp Drive Metrics. His past experience includes the NASA institute for Advanced Concepts and a technical contributor and consultant to the NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Program.

Jessica Rosslee

Guardian Express

 

Michael Boatwright 

American Michael Boatwright has left doctors baffled after waking up speaking only SWEDISH.

The 61-year-old had been found unconscious in a California motel with no memory of his past.

When he opened his eyes in a medical centre he called himself Johan Ek and spoke just Swedish.

Despite extensive enquiries, police were unable to contact any relatives or find anything out about Mr Boatwright, according to the Desert Sun newspaper.

They believe he may have been in the area for a tennis tournament, though, as he had several rackets on him when he was found.

Mr Boatwrighht, who is said to be in good health, told the paper: “Sometimes it makes me really sad and sometimes it just makes me furious about the whole situation and the fact that I don’t know anybody, I don’t recognise anybody.”

DailyMirror.uk.com

India has officially recognized dolphins as non-human persons, whose rights to life and liberty must be respected. Dolphin parks that were being built across the country will instead be shut down.

India’s Ministry of Environment and Forests has advised state governments to ban dolphinariums and other commercial entertainment that involves the capture and confinement of cetacean species such as orcas and bottlenose dolphins. In a statement, the government said research had clearly established cetaceans are highly intelligent and sensitive, and that dolphins “should be seen as ‘non-human persons’ and as such should have their own specific rights.”

The move comes after weeks of protest against a dolphin park in the state of Kerala and several other marine mammal entertainment facilities which were to be built this year. Animal welfare advocates welcomed the decision.

“This opens up a whole new discourse of ethics in the animal protection movement in India,” said Puja Mitra from the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organizations (FIAPO). Mitra is a leading voice in the Indian movement to end dolphin captivity.

Kasatka the killer whale performs during SeaWorld's Shamu show, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006, in San Diego. Trainer Ken Peters remains hospitalized after suffering a broken foot when Kasatka dragged him underwater twice during a show on Wednesday. (ddp images/AP Photo/Chris Park) Indian officials say it is morally unacceptable to exploit cetaceans in commercial entertainment

“The scientific evidence we provided during the campaign talked about cetacean intelligence and introduced the concept of non-human persons,” she said in an interview with DW.

Indiais the fourth country in the world to ban the capture and import of cetaceans for the purpose of commercial entertainment – along with Costa Rica, Hungary, and Chile.

Dolphins are persons, not performers

The movement to recognize whale and dolphins as individuals with self-awareness and a set of rights gained momentum three years ago in Helsinki, Finland when scientists and ethicists drafted a Declaration of Rights for Cetaceans. “We affirm that all cetaceans as persons have the right to life, liberty and well-being,” they wrote.

epa02917339 An undated handout picture provided by Monash University on 15 September 2011 of a new species of dolphins in Victoria's Port Phillip Bay, Australia. The new species, Tursiops Australis, which can also be found at Gippsland Lake, have a small population of 150 and were originally thought to be one of the two existing bottlenose dolphin species. EPA/MONASH UNIVERSITY / HO AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND OUT HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY +++(c) dpa - Bildfunk+++ Dolphins are naturally playful and curious, which has made them popular with aqurium visitors

The signatories included leading marine scientist Lori Marino who produced evidence that cetaceans have large, complex brains especially in areas involved in communication and cognition. Her work has shown that dolphins have a level of self-awareness similar to that of human beings. Dolphins can recognize their own reflection, use tools and understand abstract concepts. They develop unique signature whistles allowing friends and family members to recognize them, similar to the way human beings use names.

“They share intimate, close bonds with their family groups. They have their own culture, their own hunting practices – even variations in the way they communicate,” said FIAPO’s Puja Mitra.

But it is precisely this ability to learn tricks and charm audiences that have made whales and dolphins a favorite in aquatic entertainment programs around the world.

Seaworld slaughter

Disposable personal income has increased in India and there is a growing market for entertainment. Dolphin park proposals were being considered in Delhi, Kochi and Mumbai.

Lahore, PAKISTAN: Pakistani cinema goers queue for tickets for the Indian classic movie Mughal-e-Azam outside the Gulistan Cinema in Lahore, 23 April 2006. The forbidden love of Pakistanis for Indian movies was allowed into the open on 23 April with the public screening of a 1960 classic beloved on both sides of the border. AFP PHOTO/Arif ALI (Photo credit should read Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images) India’s growing middle class is hungry for entertainment

“There’s nothing like having a few animals on display, particularly ones that are so sensitive and intelligent as these dolphins,” said Belinda Wright from the Wildlife Protection Society of India in an interview with DW. “It’s a good money making proposition.”

But audiences are usually oblivious to the documented suffering of these marine performers.

“The majority of dolphins and whales in captivity have been sourced through wild captures in Japan, in Taiji, in the Caribbean, in the Solomon Islands and parts of Russia. These captures are very violent,” Mitra explained.

“They drive groups of dolphins into shallow bay areas where young females whose bodies are unmarked and are thought to be suitable for display are removed. The rest are often slaughtered.”

Mitra argued that the experience of captivity is tantamount to torture. She explained that orcas and other dolphins navigate by using sonar signals, but in tanks, the reverberations bounce off the walls, causing them “immense distress”. She described dolphins banging their heads on the walls and orcas wearing away their teeth as they pull at bars and bite walls.

Tanks terminated

In response to the new ban, the Greater Cochin Development Authority (CGDA) told DW that it has withdrawn licenses for a dolphin park in the city of Kochi, where there have been massive animal rights demonstrations in recent months.

epa03452781 A beluga whale passes by young visitors in the Cold Water Quest exhibit at the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 30 October 2012. The Georgia Aquarium, which opened in 2005, features more than 10 million gallons of water and over 60 different exhibits. EPA/ERIK S. LESSER<br />
Will the ban on captive dolphin exploitation lead to more protection for other highly intelligent non-humans?

“It is illegal now,” said N. Venugopal, who heads the CGDA. “It is over. We will not allow it anymore.”

He said the government hadn’t lost money on the development but declined to comment on how much the dolphin park was worth.

Boost for Ganges River dolphin

It’s possible that India’s new ban on cetacean captivity will lead to renewed interest in protecting the country’s own Ganges River dolphin.

“I hope this will put some energy into India’s Action Plan for the Gangetic Dolphin, which is supposed to run until 2020,” said Belinda Wright from the Wildlife Protection Society of India. “But there’s been very little action.

She said the ban was a good first stop, but warned against excessive optimism. “I’m very proud that India has done this,” she said. “I’m not trying to be cynical but I have been a conservationist in India for four decades. One gets thrilled with the wording, but I don’t think it’s going to turn to the tables.”

“But dolphins for now are safe from dolphinariums, and that’s a good thing,” she added.

DW.DE

Secret Streets Of Britain’s Atlantis Revealed

Posted: May 11, 2013 by phaedrap1 in News, Science
Tags:

MessageToEagle.com – There are several underwater ruins in various places around the world and all of them could be part of Atlantis.

The most detailed analysis ever of the archaeological remains of the lost medieval town of Dunwich, dubbed ‘Britain’s Atlantis’ has been carried out by a University of Southampton professor David Sear of Geography and Environment in cooperation with the University’s GeoData Institute; the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton; Wessex Archaeology; and local divers from North Sea Recovery and Learn Scuba.

The most accurate map to date of the town’s streets, boundaries and major buildings, and revealed new ruins on the seabed, was created by using advanced underwater imaging techniques.


Click on image to enlarge3D visualisation showing the remains of St Katherine’s Church in the now submerged town of Dunwich. Credit: University of Southampton

“Visibility under the water at Dunwich is very poor due to the muddy water. This has limited the exploration of the site,

“We have now dived on the site using high resolution DIDSON ™ acoustic imaging to examine the ruins on the seabed – a first use of this technology for non-wreck marine archaeology.

 

Bedrock structures spotted under the sea: The project to survey the underwater ruins of Dunwich, the world’s largest medieval underwater town site, began in 2008
“DIDSON technology is rather like shining a torch onto the seabed, only using sound instead of light. The data produced helps us to not only see the ruins, but also understand more about how they interact with the tidal currents and sea bed.”

 

“The loss of most of the medieval town of Dunwich over the last few hundred years – one of the most important English ports in the Middle Ages – is part of a long process that is likely to result in more losses in the future.

Everyone was surprised, though, by how much of the eroded town still survives under the sea and is identifiable,” Peter Murphy, English Heritage’s coastal survey expert who is currently completing a national assessment of coastal heritage assets in England, says.

“Whilst we cannot stop the forces of nature, we can ensure what is significant is recorded and our knowledge and memory of a place doesn’t get lost forever. Professor Sear and his team have developed techniques that will be valuable to understanding submerged and eroded terrestrial sites elsewhere.”

Present day Dunwich is a village 14 miles south of Lowestoft in Suffolk, but it was once a thriving port – similar in size to 14th Century London. Extreme storms forced coastal erosion and flooding that have almost completely wiped out this once prosperous town over the past seven centuries.

This process began in 1286 when a huge storm swept much of the settlement into the sea and silted up the Dunwich River.

 

 

Carved stonework Chapel of St Katherine was clearly visible in the scans. Credit: University of Southampton
This storm was followed by a succession of others that silted up the harbour and squeezed the economic life out of the town, leading to its eventual demise as a major international port in the 15th Century. It now lies collapsed and in ruins in a watery grave, three to 10 metres below the surface of the sea, just off the present coastline.

 

A Debris Field near St Peters spotted 10M underwater by the researchers. Credit: University of Southampton
The project to survey the underwater ruins of Dunwich, the world’s largest medieval underwater town site, began in 2008. Six additional ruins on the seabed and 74 potential archaeological sites on the seafloor have since been found.

Combining all known archaeological data from the site, together with old charts and navigation guides to the coast, it has also led to the production of the most accurate and detailed map of the street layout and position of buildings, including the town’s eight churches.
Findings highlights are:

• Identification of the limits of the town, which reveal it was a substantial urban centre occupying approximately 1.8 km2 – almost as large as the City of London

• Confirmation the town had a central area enclosed by a defensive, possibly Saxon earthwork, about 1km2

• The documentation of ten buildings of medieval Dunwich, within this enclosed area, including the location and probable ruins of Blackfriars Friary, St Peter’s, All Saint’s and St Nicholas Churches, and the Chapel of St Katherine

• Additional ruins which initial interpretation suggests are part of a large house, possibly the town hall

• Further evidence that suggests the northern area of the town was largely commercial, with wooden structures associated with the port

• The use of shoreline change analysis to predict where the coastline was located at the height of the town’s prosperity

“Global climate change has made coastal erosion a topical issue in the 21st Century, but Dunwich demonstrates that it has happened before. The severe storms of the 13th and 14th Centuries coincided with a period of climate change, turning the warmer medieval climatic optimum into what we call the Little Ice Age.

“Our coastlines have always been changing, and communities have struggled to live with this change. Dunwich reminds us that it is not only the big storms and their frequency – coming one after another, that drives erosion and flooding, but also the social and economic decisions communities make at the coast.”

“In the end, with the harbour silting up, the town partly destroyed, and falling market incomes, many people simply gave up on Dunwich.”

 

MessageToEagle.com